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Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care (B.S.R.C.)

Respiratory care providers diagnose and treat breathing issues and lung disorders. The bachelor of science in respiratory care (B.S.R.C.) degree gives students a foundation in cardiopulmonary care, including supervised patient care during clinical rotations.


93%

job placement rate for graduates

Offered

in person

Direct experience

in patient care


Career Prospects

The B.S.R.C. degree prepares students for careers as respiratory therapists providing patient care in hospitals, pediatric clinics, extended care facilities, sleep labs and more. Through clinical rotations and the opportunity for an internship in a chosen specialization, students gain professional experience before graduation. Texas State respiratory care graduates often move up quickly due to their specialized training. Because fewer than 10 percent of respiratory therapists in the United States have a B.S.R.C., this degree makes graduates competitive in the workforce.

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Accreditation

The Texas State respiratory care program (CoARC #200197) is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care.

Graduates are eligible for the national board exams administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care.

Program Structure and Topics

The B.S.R.C. program is a competitive 120-hour degree that includes clinical rotations in a variety of healthcare settings. The first two years of the degree (university core courses and prerequisites) are completed in San Marcos. By May of their sophomore year, students apply for admission into the fall B.S.R.C. class or cohort. For their last two years (junior and senior years), a cohort of 44 respiratory care students moves through the sequential curriculum together on the Round Rock Campus. Each course is a prerequisite for the next semester.

Course work covers:

  • Clinical care skills
  • Pulmonary function testing
  • Cardiopulmonary anatomy and pathology
  • Hemodynamics
  • Respiratory therapeutics
  • Technology and instrumentation
  • Research and data analysis

Clinical rotation settings include:

  • General medical and surgical units
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care units
  • Adult medical and surgical critical care units
  • Transplant intensive care units
  • Pulmonary function diagnostics
  • Polysomnography (sleep lab diagnostics)